FAQs
Denver Area Asphalt Paving & Sealcoating
Asphalt Paving & Concrete

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Cory Meade 720-289-8741

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 Fax 303-670-3657


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WHAT IS YOUR SQUARE FOOT PRICE?
The square foot price varies greatly depending on the size, location and scope of the work.
Call to arrange for a FREE estimate
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(303) 674-7926

HOW LONG DO I HAVE TO STAY OFF OF IT AFTER YOU ARE DONE?
On new asphalt we recommend 12 hours for the asphalt to cool down and harden. When Seal Coating, the manufacturer recommends a 24 hour cure time before opening to traffic. Concrete depends on the additives in the mix, but typically concrete needs 72 hours or more to cure properly.

HOW THICK A PAVEMENT SHOULD I HAVE?
Structural integrity is improved by the thickness of the pavement. This could entail a sub-base course and asphalt, or full-depth asphalt. A design could be anywhere from a 2" depth walking path to an 8" depth fire lane.

HOW LONG DOES ASPHALT LAST?
Industry standards and proper design anticipate life expectancy to be with regular maintenance around 15 to 20 years. In order for the pavement to provide a 20-year service life, at least one major corrective overlay can be expected.

DO I NEED VEGETATION CONTROL?
We highly recommend this application in most cases. this will help prevent damage to pavement due to organic growth. Some species such as yucca plants, tree roots, shrubs etc. must be removed.

CAN YOU PAVE OVER CONCRETE?
You can put asphaltic pavement over concrete, with the understanding that reflective cracking may occur. Petromat underlayment may be used to help prevent cracking.

CAN CRACK SEALING PRECEDE A SEAL COAT OR HOT MIX OVERLAY?
My concern is that the crack seal material could have a negative reaction with the new surface material. crack sealing prior to rehabilitation is a good idea. The majority of complaints concerning crack sealer problems arise when an excess of material is left on the surface of the pavement either due to overfilling or expansion of the sealant. The best method to treat cracks is to route a vessel 5/8" x 5/8" or 3/4" x 3/4" and use a modified joint sealer, and careful not to overfill the joint. The top of the sealant should be left about 1/8" to 1/4" below the top of the crack.

WHEN IS A TACK COAT NECESSARY?
Almost always. On rare occasions when a pavement is being constructed which each succeeding lift is placed only a short time later, a tack coat may not be necessary, however, a good cheap insurance policy is to always use tack coats.

WHY IS TACK COAT NEEDED?
To assure a bond between the succeeding layers of pavement.

WHAT IS RECYCLED ASPHALT AND HOW CAN I USE IT.
We are happy to report that asphalt is the most recycled material in the world, even more than aluminum. It can be reintroduced into the hot mix process for new asphalt or it can be crushed into an aggregate pavement. This application may be used as a low cost alternative to hot bituminous asphalt. (ie. driveways, storage areas.)

SHOULD A NEWLY PAVED PARKING LOT BE SEAL COATED?
No. A well designed and constructed low traffic volume pavement, such as a parking lot, should not require sealing for approximately 1 to 4 years - depending on severity of climate and quality of original work.

WHEN SHOULD A PARKING LOT BE SEALED?
Sealing is effective to renew old asphalt surfaces that have become dry and brittle with age, to seal small surface cracks and to inhibit raveling (loss of surface aggregate). so, sealing should be done as soon as any of these distresses are noted.

WHAT TYPE OF MAINTENANCE SHOULD I DO AND HOW OFTEN.
The primary cause for deterioration of low traffic volume pavement is loss of integrity of the asphalt or concrete and subgrade failure. High volumes can create pavement rutting and smooth, polished surfaces. Preventive maintenance treatments will typically preserve the original or existing pavement by providing a protective seal and improving skid resistance through a new wearing course.


Terminology

 

Terms

Definitions

A

Asphalt  

A dark brown to black cementitious material in which the prodominating constituents are bitumens, which occur in nature or are obtained in petroleum processing.  Asphalt is a constituent in varying proportions of most crude petroleum and used for paving, roofing, industrial and other special purposes.

 

Asphalt Emulsion Slurry Seal

A mixture of slow-setting emulsified asphalt, fine aggregate, and mineral filler with a slurry consistency.

 

Asphalt Leveling Course

A course of hot mix asphalt of variable thickness use to eliminate irregularities in the contour of and existing surface prior to placing the subsequent course.

 

Asphalt Pavement Structure

A pavement structure that is designed and constructed so that all courses above the subgrade are asphalt concrete.

 

Asphalt Pavements

Pavements consisting of a surface course of asphalt concrete over supporting courses such as asphalt concrete bases, crushed stone, slag, gravel, portland cement concrete, brick, or block pavement.

 

Alligator Cracks

Interconnected cracks forming a series of small blocks resembling an alligator's skin or chicken-wire, and caused by excessive deflection of the surface over unstable subgrade or lower course of the pavement.

 

 

 

B

Base Course

The layer in the pavement system immediately below the binder and surface courses. it usually cojnsists of crushed stone, although it may consist of crushed slag or other stabilized or unstabilized material.

 

Binder Course

The layer in the pavement system immediately below the binder and surface courses. It usually cojnsists of crushed stone, although it may consist of crushed slag or other stabilized or unstabilized material.

 

Bitumen

A class of black or dark-colored (solid, semisolid, or viscous) cementitious substances, natural or manufactured, composed principally of high molecular weight hydrocarbons, of which asphalts, tars, pitches, and asphaltites are typical.

 

 

 

C

Coal Tar

A dark brown to black cementitious material produced by the destuctive distillation of bituminous coal.

 

Compaction

The act of compressing a given volume of material into a smaller volume.

 

Crack

An approximately vertical random cleavage of the pavement caused by traffic loading, thermal stresses and/or aging of the binder.

 

Curing

The development of mechanical properties of the asphalt binder. This occurs after the emulsion has broken and the emulsion particles coalesce and bond to the aggregate.

 

 

 

E

Expansive Potential

The potential of a soil to expand (increase in volume) due to absorbtion of moisture.

 

 

 

F

Finished Grade

The final grade created as part of the project.

 

Footing

A portion of the foundation of a structure that transmits loads directly to the soil.

 

Foundation

The lower part of a structure that transmits loads to the soil or bedrock.

 

Frost Depth

The depth at which the ground becomes frozen during the winter season.

 

Full-depth Asphalt Pavement

The term full-depth certifies that the pavement is one in which asphalt mixtures are employed for all courses above the subgrade or improved subgrade. A full-depth asphalt pavement is placed directly on the prepared subgrade.

 

 

 

G

Grade

The soil prepared to support a pavement structure or a pavement system. It is the foundation of the pavement structure.

 

Grade Beam

A foundation element or wall, typically constructed of reinforced concrete, used to span between other foundation elements such as drilled piers.

 

Groundwater

Subsurface water found in the zone of saturation of soils or within fractures in bedrock.

 

 

 

H

Heave

Upward movement.

 

Hot Mix Asphalt

High quality, thoroughly controlled hot mixture of asphalt binder (cement) and well-graded, high quality aggregate, which can be compacted into a uniform dense mass.

 

Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) Overlay

One or more courses of HMA over an existing pavement.

J

Joint Cracks

Longitudinal separations along the seam between two paving lanes.

 

 

 

L

Lift

A layer or course of paving material applied to a base or a previous layer.

 

Lime Treated Subgrade

A subgrade preparation technique in which the subgrade soil and added lime are mechanically mixed and compacted to produce a higher modulus base material than the in-situ material.

 

Lithologic

The characteristics which describe the composition and texture of soil and rock by observation.

 

 

 

N

Native Grade

The naturally occurring ground surface.

 

Native Soil

Naturally occurring on-site soil, sometimes referred to as natural soil.

 

 

 

O

Optimum Moisture Content

The water content at which a soil can be compacted to a maximum dry unit weight by a given compactive effort.

 

 

 

P

Pavement Base

The lower or underlying pavement course atop the subbase or subgrade and under the top or wearing course.

 

Pavement Structure

The entire pavement system of selected material from subgrade to the surface.

 

Perched Water

Groundwater usually of limited area maintained above a normal water elevation by the presence of and intervening relatively impervious continuous stratum.

 

 

 

R

Raveling

The progressive separation of aggregate particles in a pavement from the edges inward.

 

Reclaimed asphalt pavement (rap)

Excavated asphalt pavement that has been pulverized, usually by milling, and is used like an aggregate in the recycling of asphalt pavements.

 

Recycled Asphalt Mix

A mixture produced after processing existing asphalt pavement material. The recycled mix may be produced by hot or cold mixing at a plant, or by procesing the materials cold and in-place.

 

Reflection Cracks

Cracks in asphalt overlays that reflect the crack pattern in the pavement structure below it.

 

 

 

S

Scarify

To mechanically loosen soil or break down existing soil structure, and add water to improve compaction and stabilize soil.

 

Settlement

Downward movement.

 

Skin Friction (Side Shear)

The frictional resistance developed between soil and an element of the structure such as a drilled pier.

 

Soil (Earth)

Sediments or other unconsolidated accumulations of solid particles produced by the physical and chemical disintegration of rocks, and which may or may not contain organic matter.

 

Strain

The change in length per unit of length in a given direction.

 

Stress

The force per unit area acting within a soil mass.

 

Strip

To remove from the present location.

 

Subbase

The course in the asphalt pavement structure immediately below the base course. If the subgrade soil has adequate support, it may serve as the subbase.

 

Subgrade

The soil prepared and compacted to support a structure, slab or pavement system.

 

 

 

U

Upheaval

The localized upward displacement of a pavement due to swelling of the subgrade or some portion of the pavement structure.